Mythbusting Scientific Knowledge Transfer with nanoHUB.org

Nano@Tech

Mythbusting Scientific Knowledge Transfer with nanoHUB.org

In the 1960’s, university-based open source code development and sharing led to breakthroughs in the electronic design software that ultimately powered the semiconductor industry. Other disciplines are taking on that open and collaborative model to share research leading to breakthroughs in other fields.

One example is NanoHUB.org developed at Purdue University, NanoHUB is an online gateway to simulation, research, collaboration and teaching in the nano-sciences.

From 12 p.m. – 1 p.m., Dr. Timothy Fisher of Purdue will speak about the successes of an interdisciplinary community coming together to use a collaborative tool for sharing information, tools and resources, and why openness is an important key to success. Then, from 2 p.m. – 4 p.m., Dr. Tanya Faltens of Purdue will lead a workshop focused on the demonstration and use of NanoHUB.

Dr. Timothy Fisher & Dr. Tanya Faltens of Purdue University

Mythbusting Scientific Knowledge Transfer with nanoHUB.org: Collaborative Research and Dissemination with Quantifiable Impact on Research and Education

Date: October 22, 2013
Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Location: Marcus Nanotechnology Building, Conference Room (room 1117-1118)
*LUNCH PROVIDED*
This session will be streamed live at: http://www.library.gatech.edu/openaccess/content/live-stream.

Introduction to nanoHUB.org: online simulation and more
Date: October 22, 2013
Time: 2:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Location: Marcus Nanotechnology Building, Conference Room (room 1117-1118)

Timothy Fisher

Timothy S. Fisher (PhD in Mechanical Engineering, 1998, Cornell) was born in Aurora, Illinois. He joined Purdue University’s School of Mechanical Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center in 2002 after several years at Vanderbilt University. He is an adjunct professor in the International Centre for Materials Science at the Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore. From 2009 to 2011, he served as a research scientist at the Air Force Research Laboratory’s newly formed Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch of the Materials and Manufacturing Directorate. Prior to his graduate studies, he was employed from 1991 to 1993 as a design engineer in Motorola’s Automotive and Industrial Electronics Group. His research has included studies of nanoscale heat transfer, carbon nanomaterial synthesis, coupled electro-thermal effects in semiconductor and electron emission devices, energy conversion and storage materials and devices, microfluidic devices, biosensing, and related computational methods ranging from atomistic to continuum scales. For more information, visit his group’s homepage.

 

Tanya Faltens

Educational Content Creation Manager for the Network for Computational Nanotechnology, Purdue University

Tanya Faltens is the Educational Content Creation Manager for the Network for Computational Nanotechnology (NCN.) Her background is in Materials Science and Engineering (Ph.D. UCLA 2002), and she has mentored undergraduate materials engineering research in several areas, including the synthesis and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles for use in wastewater remediation and the creation of thin-film wide band-gap semiconductor structures with controlled nanoscale porosity for organic photovoltaics. While a professor at Cal Poly Pomona, she used nanoHUB simulation tools with undergraduate students in engineering courses she taught in materials science and engineering and electrical engineering. She has 2.5 years of hands-on informal science education experience at the Lawrence Hall of Science, UC Berkeley, and continues to be involved in nanoscale science and technology outreach activities.